Computing is the new English as it becomes the nation’s favourite school subject

News
Cet article a été vu (415) fois.
Source : finchannel.com
Auteur : Newseditor
Date de l'info : 15 janvier 2015

cd4c1b5b697d814c8e858e747a7a236d_L

The FINANCIAL — A quarter (24 per cent) of British school children say computing, incorporating skills such as learning the code behind the latest generation of graphic-heavy computer games – is their favourite school subject, Barclays research shows.

The findings show just how far education has swung from their parents’ generation who favoured English during their school days (21 per cent).

However, the statistics also show that the introduction of coding into the National Curriculum² has left some parents unable to help on the new favourite school subject. Nearly a third of parents (30 per cent) don’t believe that they can assist their children with computing homework and two fifths (40 per cent) said they ‘dread’ helping with it.

As a result, other family members are becoming an additional ‘helpdesk’ for homework with nearly half (49 per cent) of all school children getting homework help from their brothers and sisters on the subjects their parents find the hardest (computing and maths), according to Barclays.

With over two fifths (41 per cent) of parents feeling left behind by their children’s increasing digital skill set, almost half of all parents (49 per cent) want the opportunity to learn more about coding and digital technology, with one of the reasons cited as being able to help with homework.

And it comes as no surprise that over three quarters of parents (77 per cent) believe it is important for children to be learning coding skills, particularly as code sits behind many of things we interact with every day from smartphone apps and computer games to the graphics we see in TV advertising and in blockbuster films.

With this in mind, Barclays Digital Eagles are continuing to help families of all ages acquire and embrace digital skills and knowledge through the launch of ‘Code Playground’.

Click here to read the full article.

FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle+Email